Christmas Eve 2017, part 3

Christmas Eve 2017, part 3

In Iceland people participated in Jolabokaflod, the “Christmas Book Flood,” where on Christmas Eve, everyone opens their presents (aka books) and spends the rest of the night reading. Think about it, a county where the default Christmas gift is a book. So here is my reading selection for Christmas Eve and also drinking hot coco just like the Icelanders do.

Book review!

My latest book review was published last month and I did not even know it. This was book review #128!

“A Village with My Name: A Family History of China’s Opening to the World” by Scott Tong. Library Journal, 11/15/2017, Vol. 142, Issue 19, p86-87.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Village 1

A shiny new Jane Austen

Arrived home to find the British money fairy had left me a shiny new Jane Austen (Jane is now on the £10) on my back steps! Comes with a Queen Elizabeth action hologram.

Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota

This past Wednesday (November 29) found me at a really fun talk “The Singular Case of Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota” with author Larry Millett and Curator Tim Johnson. It was a sold out event and they had to move the talk into a larger room – from Elmer L. Andersen Library to Willey Hall. I remember meeting Larry years ago when I worked in the Saint Paul Pioneer Press Library. Unfortunately I was not able to stay for the reception or the book signing.

Here was the blurb on the event: “Sherlock Holmes is not just a character on PBS! He made quite a mark in Minnesota during his career as the world’s foremost detective. Learn how Holmes first came to the state in 1894 and returned for six more adventures. And why the great detective remains very much a presence in Minnesota today via the magnificent Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries” (https://www.continuum.umn.edu/event/singular-case-sherlock-holmes-minnesota/).


My ‘Where’s Waldo’ moment. (photo from @NEofMN 11/29/2017)

Underwater exhibit

The Wangensteen Historical Library has a new Underwater exhibit that “explores humans, health, and science in watery spaces. Discover what voyagers encountered on the sea and how interactions in and around water have been the harbinger of health and illness across the centuries. Viewers will explore topics from sewage treatment and public health to ocean voyages and pharmaceuticals from the sea. Rare books in the exhibit feature striking images of aquatic natural history, various technologies, and experiences of water and health” (https://hsl.lib.umn.edu/wangensteen/exhibits-and-events/underwater).